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Dr Jackson Home    Learning Objectives      Term Assignment      Critical Issues Survey
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Welcome to Critical Issues in Psychology. From this page you can access all the information you will need to complete the course. Links are available to course lecture templates, selected lecture notes, readings, learning objectives, and instructor contact information. I hope you enjoy the course.

Jeremy Jackson

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The Course Syllabus......
Instructor
Jeremy Jackson
|    Jan 4, 2021
Office:
NW 3428
Online
Carl Sagan: "Science is a way of thinking much more than a body of knowledge"

Instructor Contact Information

Douglas email: DO NOT USE my douglas email at jacksonj@douglascollege.ca. I will NOT RESPOND to emails sent to this adress. Use the "Mail" function in the main menu of this course in Blackboard.

Mail availability: I will be available between Tuesday and Thursday (9 am to 5 pm). If you have questions, please plan to ask them around these times.

Mail Requirements : All mail correspondence should include: 1) Your name and student number, 2) A salutation such as "Hello Dr Jackson....", 3) An appropriate ending to the email thanking the person for their time in considering your request.

Here is a webpage about how to write professional emails to a professor: http://www.wikihow.com/Email-a-Professor.

Office hours : None in-person. Use Blackboard to ask course questions.

How Does The Course Work

This is an ONLINE course. This means you are responsible to engage in Online study, discussion and quiz writting. The syllabus details the weeks and days on which quizzes will be held and when Online discussion is required. Please read the syllabus carefully and watch the following "Introduction video 1".

Throughout the course there will be 3 multiple choice and SA exams. The syllabus indicates the weeks on which there will be an exam. Both exams will be completed Online. Students will have 45 minutes to complete each exam. Exam 1 is worth 15% and exams 2 and 3 are worth 20% each.

Answers to multiple choice questions are mostly found in the text material and answers to SA questions will be given in the lecture notes. There are 17 SA questions for the course. Please see the "learning objectives" document for the 19 questions. For each exam, I will randomly select 2 of the questions. It is HIGHLY recommended that you prepare your answers to these questions in advance. I am expecting 1 page, well-written, grammatically correct, thoughtful and factually correct answers to these questions.

There will also be 2 discussion questions. These questions and the associated discussion will be completed Online and are designed to engage you in serious discussion and debate about the Online readings. The syllabus and lecture summaries contain details about when the discussion questions are to be answered. Each discussion question is worth 10% of your course grade.

Students are required to complete 1 term assignment, worth 25% of the final course grade. This assignment is a group video presentation. The presentation will be given as a group, put on video and uploaded to Blackboard. The presentation is 20 minutes long. Groups are of 4 students. Each student will present for 5 minutes. The video is to be handed in Online on or before April 10th.

Groups are expected to open and curate a thread online in which they develop their project and receive ongoing help and feedback from the instructor. The contribution of each student to the thread will be graded. See the "Term Assignment" page and weekly announcements for details.

Week 1 - Jan 4th

Introduction to the course - Introduction to the course video, The course syllabus video, Lecture 1.

Introduce yourself Online to the class. Go to the "Discussion Board" tab on Blackboard in the main menu.

Reading: Chapter 1 Schultz and Schultz

Week 2 - Jan 11th

Lecture 2 - metaphysics, epistemology, rationalism, empiricism.

Reading: Chapter 2 Schultz and Schultz video presentation

Week 3 - Jan 18th

Lecture 3 - Philosophy of Science, The Mill's, the mind-body problem.

Reading: Chapter 3 Schultz and Schultz video presentation

Week 4 - Jan 25th

Discussion Question 1 - See week 3 lecture notes (Lecture 3). Due WEEK 4, 9:00 am Tuesday thru 7:00 pm Friday (Jan 26 to Jan 29). POST EARLY, ENGAGE IN DISCUSSION WITH CLASSMATES!

Lecture 4 - Weber, Fechner, JND, Wundt., Structuralism, Titchener, Functionalism, James.

Reading: Chapter 4 Schultz and Schultz video presentation, Chapter 5 Schultz and Schultz video presentation

Week 5 - Feb 1st

Lecture 5 - Behaviourism, Watson vs MacDougall debate.

Reading: Chapters 7 & 8 Schultz and Schultz video presentation. Chapter 9 Schultz and Schultz video presentation.

Week 6 - Feb 8th

Online Exam 1

Exam 1 opens on Blackboard under the "assessments" tab at 7pm on Tuesday Feb 9th and closes at 7pm on Thursday Feb 11th. You may write the exam any time between these times/dates. You have 45 minutes to complete the exam. Write your learning objectives answers in advance and cut and paste them in to the spaces provided.

Readings - Schultz and Schultz, chapters 1 - 5, 7 - 9. Metaphysics and epistemology. Lecture notes 1-5. Watson vs MacDougall.

SA Questions: 2, 10 marks each. MC Questions: 25, 1 mark each

Week 7 - Feb 15th

Lecture 6 - Behaviourism review, operationism, positivism, Pavlov, Skinner

Reading: Chapter 10 Schultz and Schultz video presentation, Chapter 11 Schultz and Schultz video presentation.

Week 8 - Feb 22nd

Discussion Question 2 - See week 7 lecture notes (Lecture 6). Due WEEK 8, 9:00 am Tuesday thru 9:00 pm Friday (Feb 23rd to Feb 26th). POST EARLY, ENGAGE IN DISCUSSION WITH CLASSMATES!

Lecture 7 - Construct validity theory

Reading: No readings this week.

Week 9 - Mar 1st

Lecture 8 - Cognitive psychology

Reading: Neisser, Chapter 15 Schultz and Schultz video presentation.

Week 10 - Mar 8th

Online Exam 2

Quiz 2 opens at 7pm on Tuesday Mar 9th and closes at 7pm on Thursday Mar 11th. You may write the quiz any time between these times/dates. You have 45 minutes to complete the quiz.

Readings - Schultz and Schultz, chapters 10 & 15. Cronbach and Meehl, Neisser, lectures 6-8.

SA Questions: 2, 10 marks each. MC Questions: 25, 1 mark each

Week 11- Mar 15th

Lecture 9 - The "What Is It" Problem, The OLV, Wittgenstein, Baker and Hacker.

Readings: Baker and Hacker, Hacker in Holland, Hacker in Oxford

Week 12 - Mar 22nd

Lecture 10

Readings: Szasz interviews, chapter 1 of Mad Science, Szasz Critique

Week 13 - Mar 29th

Lecture 10

Readings: Debate About The Nature of Depression: A 5-minute conversation with Joe

Chair of DSM-IV, Allen Frances - The role of definition and meaning on the rate of mental disorder - Allen Frances

Chair of DSM-IV, Allen Frances - The role of economics, paradigms, and zeitgeists in over-diagnosis - Allen Frances

A most beautiful introduction to an international conference on over-diagnosis held in 2014 - Iona Heath

The British Psychological Society on DSM-V - The British Psychological Society on DSM-V

Group Project Due Online by 6:00 pm April 4th

Week 14 - April 5th

Online Exam 3

Quiz 3 opens at 7pm on Tuesday April 6th and closes at 7pm on Thursday April 8th. You may write the quiz any time between these times/dates. You have 45 minutes to complete the quiz.

Readings - Lectures 9 & 10. All readings listed in the syllabus.

SA Questions: 2, 10 marks each. MC Questions: 25, 1 mark each

Assignments & Quizzes Late Policy

Late assignments will receive a penalty of 5% per day late including weekends/holidays. The instructor reserves the right to refuse to accept late assignments. Assignments will not be accepted more than 1 week past the date and time given above. Failure to hand in the assignment may result in automatic failure in the course as the assignment is a required course element.

All quizzes are to be completed in class. ONLY MEDICAL extensions are accepted for quizzes. Supporting medical documentation must be provided for a missed quiz.

Academic Dishonesty - Plagiarism & Cheating

Cheating , which includes plagiarism, occurs where a student or group of students uses or attempts to use unauthorized aids, assistance, materials or methods. Cheating is a serious educational offense.

Plagiarism occurs where the student represents the work of another person as his or her own. Douglas College condemns all forms of cheating.

The college will discipline students found to be cheating. Discipline may include:

1. a grade of zero may be awarded for the affected assignment, test, paper, analysis, etc.;

2. a failing grade may be assigned in the affected course;

3. referral to the College President for the assignment of discipline, which may include suspension from the college.

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